Pre-election provocations in Pakistan irresponsible

This article was originally published by Asia Times

Samuel Johnson, the famous English poet and moralist, once remarked that patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel. The saying couldn’t have been truer in the case of Pakistan. Continue reading

American conspiracies and the Pashtun Spring

This article was originally published by Asia Times.

In his recent analysis for the Hoover Institution, Colonel Ralph Peters called Pakistan a little empire. He sees two separate geographical entities within Pakistan straddling the Indus River with their respective distinct cultures. The side of Pakistan east of the Indus, he asserted, has the population and resources required to colonize the rest of Pakistan west of the river. Continue reading

Militarism and Democracy in Pakistan

There is more than one reason why I believe Jon Snow will end up sitting on the Iron Throne. It is not just because of a now apparent truth about his bloodline or because he is bold and handsome. I don’t exactly agree with the “fortune favors the bold” cliche anyway. I believe so because he just doesn’t want power. Continue reading

A Dialogue for Civilian Supremacy

The challenge to bring the military under civilian supremacy is not exclusively Pakistani. It is faced by governments the world over, democratic and non-democratic alike. However, our presumed or real existential threats have made this the foremost institutionalisation challenge for our people. Continue reading

The Dangerous Pakistani Fallacy

I was anti-Musharraf. I am anti-dictatorship. Down to the bone marrow, I detest the idea of a military coup. But, even in being so, do I hate the person, the institute or the idea of military subversion of civilian authority? I am an ordinary civilian too down below Pervez Musharraf in the social hierarchy. I operate alone. I am a small time, insignificant, blogger who nobody gives a damn about, and who happens to have a tiny mind that gibbers. I have no guns to protect me, no army and no private security detail to shield me. I also obviously don’t own any penthouses abroad to enjoy a luxurious self-exile. In fact, in my insignificant salary, I am barely making the both ends meet. Continue reading

The Necessity of Democracy

This essay on democracy is written in continuance of the chain of thoughts that triggered last week’s essay. Please read the previous week’s essay: The Necessity of Constitution first if you haven’t already.

Democracy – most people love it; some despise it while all are intrigued by it. It is arguably the most commonly referred-to political phenomenon in human history. The idea of democracy is pervasive throughout the recorded intellectual discourse on organised society since Greek antiquity. Continue reading

The Dangers of Minus One Formula

Minus one in politics is often a dangerous idea and is counterproductive. Brutus did not fare well much long after he gave Julius Caesar the fatal blow. That much is pretty true everywhere. Continue reading

How Can We Defeat Terrorism?

The world, no matter the popular political rhetoric, cannot rid itself of the menace of terrorism unless it agrees with a single definition of the term and detaches that interpretation from all types of religious faiths. Continue reading

One Privatisation to Fix Them All

The other day in our Public Finance class we were analysing the annual financial statements of the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) that a thought struck me. The thought made me giggle and my imagination floated my mind away from the seminar discussion which I regretted greatly afterwards. Continue reading

Foreign Policy in a Changing World

In the arena of international relations, there is no such thing as equality. The perception of state’s power and national interests set the stage of how states interact with each other. Coincidently, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s visit to the United States coincided with the visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the United Kingdom. The difference of reception of both leaders by their host countries is a classic example how states perceive other states and treat them accordingly.

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