Halal jihad, Pakistan and the blood borders

This article was originally published by Asia Times.

Hussain Haqqani, the former Pakistani ambassador to the United States and now director for South and Central Asia at the Washington-based Hudson Institute, once called radical Islam “the single most dangerous idea that has emerged in the Muslim world”.

He often blames Pakistan for much of what is wrong in the region. What he calls “radical Islam”, in its current shape, emerged in the tribal regions of Pakistan midwifed by the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States. Continue reading “Halal jihad, Pakistan and the blood borders”

Recipe for total war on the Grand Chessboard

The article was originally published by Asia Times.

The late Zbigniew Brzezinski was the mastermind of the Afghan “jihad”. It was under his auspices that the United States created “mad mullahs” to unleash “terror” against the Soviet regime in Kabul. When the deed was done, and the Red Army packed its bags and went home, the US abandoned Afghanistan. Pakistan, on the other hand, was slapped with the Pressler Amendment in return for its servitude in the Washington-certified “halal” jihad. Continue reading “Recipe for total war on the Grand Chessboard”

The right question about Trump’s Afghan policy

This article was originally published by Asia Times.

The argument that Pakistan doesn’t harbor militants and has made the greatest sacrifices in the “war on terror” holds almost negative value in Washington, DC. It appears that the current US administration believes that, rather, Pakistan is adamant on pursuing “bad behavior”. And for the hawks in the White House, on Capitol Hill, at the Pentagon and in Langley, such bad behavior necessitates punishment. Continue reading “The right question about Trump’s Afghan policy”

Foreign Policy in a Changing World

In the arena of international relations, there is no such thing as equality. The perception of state’s power and national interests set the stage of how states interact with each other. Coincidently, Pakistan’s Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s visit to the United States coincided with the visit of Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to the United Kingdom. The difference of reception of both leaders by their host countries is a classic example how states perceive other states and treat them accordingly.

Continue reading “Foreign Policy in a Changing World”